How I Designed My Tiny House

Today I have a super guest post from my good friend and Tiny Transition and Downsizing student Jenn Baxter!

Jenn has been living in her tiny house for some time now, after initially starting her transition to the tiny life in the Tiny Transition and Downsizing E-Course.

I asked Jenn if she would write about her experience designing her own UNIQUE tiny home, and she said she would love to! Not only that, but she has created a free worksheet that you can use to design your own tiny home. You can grab the free tiny house design worksheet below!

Let's get to it! I'll let Jenn take it from here. Thanks Jenn!

One of the main questions I get when people first see my tiny house is, “How did you design this?”  Well, the answer to that is actually pretty easy. 

I thought about what I need every day.

First of all, designing a tiny house in and of itself is easier than designing a traditional home, simply because of its size.  When you are only working with 100-300 square feet, your choices are limited to begin with.

Tiny Life Metamorphosis: a Guest Post by Freda Salatino

Today I'm excited to share a guest post from a Tiny Transition and Downsizing student, Freda Salatino. She's been downsizing for a long time and has so much wisdom and experiences to share with you! I hope her story inspires you to take action and seek out that freedom you desire!

The nest session of our Tiny Transition and Downsizing E-Course starts on June 28th, and I'd love to see you in there! This is an 8-week course that fundamentally changes your relationship with stuff and helps you de-clutter, downsize, and clear out your home and mind, in a step-by-step zero-overwhelm environment.

Registration is open for the session beginning on June 28th. Preparing to transition into a tiny home, RV, trailer or cabin? Just want to clear your space and get some sanity in your current home? This is for you. You'll be in supportive group of like minded friends and kindred spirits! Register here and join us for the next session.

I'll hand it over to Freda, who shares her story below:

Every week I prep for the laundromat by gathering my weekly giveaways. It's convenient; there's a Goodwill truck parked permanently in the Laundromat parking lot. I bring clothes to be washed, magazines or books to drop at the free book exchange outside the laundromat, and usable items that I no longer need or want, to the Goodwill truck.

There's nothing dramatic about the process, really.

It feels as natural as going grocery shopping.

Where do you park it? How to find land for you tiny home or trailer

(Before we dive into finding land for your tiny home - Just a reminder that the next session of Tiny Transition and Downsizing, the 8-week E-Course that completely changes your relationship with "stuff" and helps you get ready to live tiny, start on June 28th! You'll be in a supportive, fun group of kindred spirits on the same journey as you when you join. You can register right here!)

 

What’s one of the best things about having a house that’s built on a flatbed trailer?  The ability to up and move it whenever you want, of course. 

Want to go to the mountains for the winter?  Go. 

Always dreamt of living at the beach?  Done. 

With a tiny house, when you want to move, there’s no searching for homes in the new city while trying to sell your house in the old city.  You just hook it up and move!

But with that wondrous advantage of flexibility, comes the reality that when you have a tiny house, you don’t really have a permanent place to live.  Unless you already own some land, you will have to find a place to park it.

The requirements will vary based on the particular design of the tiny house. 

Building our Next Egg and Starting Small: The Bespin Tiny House

Building our Next Egg and Starting Small: The Bespin Tiny House

BESPIN TINY HOUSE: BUILDING OUR NEST EGG 

A guest post by Maggie & Seth Campbell

 

The American Dream: the idea that a better life can be obtained with more money.

We seek out higher paying jobs so we can afford bigger living spaces and more possessions to fill them.

The temptation to live beyond our means grows stronger with every “low-interest” credit card offer in the mail. It’s no wonder that one in three American’s are being chased by a debt collector – we live in a buy-now-pay-later society. And boy, do we pay.

By now, you’ve probably heard that living in a cost-efficient tiny house is increasing in public favor.

Could you be a part of this growing trend?

What if you could live debt-free on your current monthly income (or less)?

Is it possible to stop working over 40 hours a week and living paycheck-to-paycheck to support a home you spend so little time in?

We think so.

In just 8 months, we've already raised over 25% of our goal - and we're just warming up.

 

SET YOUR INTENTIONS

For many people, building a tiny house is just a pipe dream. When the idea of building our house first came to us, we spoke about it in terms like “If we ever hit the lottery . . .” or “If we could find higher paying jobs. . . .”

As per usual, we had just enough money in the bank to pay our bills for that month. It wasn’t until we took a hard look at the cost of living in a house too large for our needs (1000 square feet) that we realized we didn’t need to earn more; we just needed to have less.

Want a tiny house in your backyard?

Have you ever thought it would be cool to have a tiny house in your backyard?

Well my friend Jenn (you can read all about her story right here) is looking for a place to park her adorable tiny house in the North Carolina area.

Jenn is such a cool girl - we became friends in the Tiny Transition + Downsizing course (she's a student!) and she's just one of those people that you admire for taking action, living life to the fullest, and being brave in everything she does. Jenn is also a writer - who doesn't want a writer in a tiny house in their yard? It's seriously adorably perfect.

Here's what Jen told me about what she's looking for in a tiny house parking space:

"Hi!  I’m Jenn.  I’m in the process of building a 144 sq. foot tiny house that is built on an 8’ x 20’ flatbed trailer.

I am looking for a place to put it in Lake Norman, preferably in Davidson or Cornelius, but will take anywhere in the LKN area! 

The only hook-ups I will need are water (a hose from an outdoor faucet) and electric (an extension cord from an outdoor outlet).  I am using a “waterless toilet” so I won’t require a sewage hook-up.  I also plan to put a “wrap” around the bottom of the house once it’s in place so you won’t be able to see the trailer or the wheels.

I am a thirty-something single professional with 2 small, well-behaved dogs so I am a quiet neighbor.  I will pay my portion of utilities outright and am willing to pay a small monthly fee for renting space on your property if needed.  I can also offer pet-sitting/dog-walking services in exchange or help out with gardening, shopping, etc.

If you have a place for me to “park” my house, please email me at jbaxter29 (at) gmail.com.

Thank you!!"

 

If you want to know more about Jenn and her tiny house, please visit her blog right here.

Thanks for being such a great part of this community!

 

Seven Steps to Simple: The No-BS Guide to Letting Go

You know you want to downsize. Heck - you NEED to downsize if you’re thinking about living in a tiny or small home!

And beyond that, no matter how many square feet you're gonna live in (because let's be honest that's not what matters), downsizing feels good. It saves you money. It gives you more time for your hobbies, family, friends, travel. More dollars in your pocket. Less stress. All that good stuff.

You know that downsizing will allow you to save more money, live the life you want to live, and have the time and financial freedom.

Maybe you’ve tried to “get organized” and “de-clutter” before. It probably felt pretty good…at first. But a few days later, your home looks the same as it did before. And the progress you’re making is slow-going. You’re stuck. You’re not sure why - because you’ve read the books and the blogs but nothing really works. 

Well, today I've got seven steps to help you let go.

And if you want to take it further and do a step by step process and method (based on years of experience and working with hundreds of people to go through this transition), you can join the Tiny Transition and Downsizing E-Course. Class starts on May 3rd. You can register right here!

Let's get right into it!

 

Step 1. Why are you simplifying?

The first thing you need to do is ask yourself WHY you’re simplifying your life and your stuff, and establish some real goals (physical, emotional) about what you hope to achieve. Do you want to travel more? Have a better marriage or family relationships? Find financial freedom and eliminate debt?

Whatever it may be for you (and it will be UNIQUE!) you need to know what it is before you start.

And then you need to write it down! This helps you make it REAL.



Step 2. Assess your stuff

Once you’ve decided to simplify, you need to ask yourself a few simple questions:

“Does this bring me joy?” 
“What do I want to keep?” 
“Would I buy this again?"
"Would I wear it on a first date?”


One way to downsize is to ask yourself the question: “What should I keep?”.

It’s a more “additive” approach which is a little more fun than a “subtractive” approach (which is asking the question “what should I get rid of").

Imagine that you have a completely blank slate. You’re building a new life from the ground up and you only need to bring the things with you that you truly love. Isn’t that exciting?!
 


Step 3. Tackle the kitchen like a pro.

Okay - the kitchen can be a TOUGH place to downsize for a lot of people. It’s full of things you thought you would use, things you bought and never touched, and tons of expensive but single-purpose gadgets.

I believe that occasional-use Kitchen Toys are your enemy when you’re trying to downsize and simplify your kitchen.

Those things that take up a lot of space but only get used once a year? I say ditch it.

Living in a tiny space is all about NOT planning for the “what ifs” and “every possible scenario”. You don’t need anything in your kitchen that serves only one purpose, unless you’re a total foodie and baking is your life (in which case do whatever you want!).

And if you’re trying to go off-grid with your tiny house, you’ll thank me for lessening your electric load!

The Kitchen Toys:
What you don’t need (unless you can convince me otherwise):

  • Ice cream maker
  • electric pop corn popper
  • Microwave
  • Fancy food processors that take a long time to come apart and are hard to clean
  • Fancy China
  • Real Silverware in a velvet-lined case (from your wedding)
  • Specialized Glassware: An assortment of wine glasses, Martini glasses, and beer mugs in every shape and 8 of each? You need as many vessels as there are people in your household, and no more!
  • Cheap Mixers – just use a spoon and a bowl, no need for an electrical appliance here.
  • Toaster – grilled toast tastes better!
  • Bundt cake form
  • any type of special cake form
  • fancy baking supplies for frosting and cupcake making
  • “holiday” anything – if it has a “theme” like thanksgiving or Christmas, get rid of it. Just get one nice set of dishes that can be used for every single day.
  • a block of 12 knives. You only need one or two really nice knives, and a sharpener.
  • Anything “As Seen On TV” that was meant to make your life better but got pushed to the back of the drawer.
  • Cookbooks. Any recipe can be found online, there is no need to keep a bunch of cookbooks (unless it was your great great grandmothers or something very special!).

If you haven’t used it in the last 2 months, you really don’t need it. You need the right tools, not more of the useless gadgets you see at the kitchen stores!

My Tiny Kitchen Essentials Inventory:
This is the stuff I use on a regular basis, things that you should definitely include in your kitchen!

  • One medium sized cast iron pan (I love cast iron!)
  • One small saucepan
  • 2 plate-bowls from Ikea – these are the only vessels I will ever need. It’s like a plate and a bowl combined. Genius.
  • 2 sets of silverware
  • one French Press
  • 2 coffee mugs
  • 1 tea strainer for loose leaf
  • 1 Tea pot
  • 1 set of various plastic containers for leftovers – no plastic wrap.
  • Citrus juicer (hand powered, of course)
  • 1 cutting board
  • 1 Pyrex or other baking pan (not 5 or 10 or one in every single size, just one).
  • 1 colander
  • 1 nice knife
  • 1 spatula
  • 1 multi-purpose measuring cup, not a “set” of nesting ones.
  • 1 can opener
  • 1 whisk
  • 1 mixing bowl

The One-Bowl Method:
My partner Matt and I found one single plate-bowl (it’s a wide, medium shallow bowl from Ikea) that we love enough to use exclusively every day. You can eat almost anything out of it, except maybe a steak (for cutting reasons). Breakfast, lunch, or dinner – we really only need one multi-purpose vessel!


Simplifying the Fridge:
In your small home you will most likely have a small fridge. The good news is that it’s hard to stash lots of unused and unhealthy stuff in a tiny fridge. Fermented foods are a great way to have healthy, probiotic foods that don’t require refrigeration. Your fridge should only be home to the essentials. Here is a list of items that don’t need refrigeration so that you can declutter that icebox!

  • Ghee (clarified butter – so good!)
  • Most fresh fruits and vegetables – It drives me nuts when my mom puts tomatoes in the fridge! That’s not good! It makes the vegetable actually go bad faster.
  • Bread – Maybe it’s just my mom, but she puts bread in the fridge too! Makes it go bad faster.
  • Potatoes
  • Honey
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Peanut Butter
  • Bread
  • Bananas
  • Baked Goods
  • Oils
  • Apples

And that’s it! Those are my most essential strategies for simplifying and downsizing your kitchen. Most people have out of control kitchen situations, and feel pretty bad for giving away expensive kitchen gadgets. I give you permission to ditch the crap you don’t use and make room for a simpler, de-cluttered life!



Step 4. Eliminate "Decision Fatigue"

Decision fatigue is when you become overwhelmed with making hundreds of tiny decisions about meaningless stuff that you become too exhausted to make bigger, important decisions. This is the reason that many successful people wear the same thing every day - they have more important decisions to make than to figure out what to wear every day. 

Having too much stuff leads to decision fatigue. And when you’re trying to downsize and simplify, deciding if every single item you own should stay or go can be exhausting. 

Here’s what to do about it:

1. Have a simple outfit that you wear everyday. Eliminate the decisions around getting dressed, matching, all that stuff. I wear black jeans and a grey shirt. Easy.

2. Make a big batch of food in the crock pot at the beginning of the week, then eat the same thing for lunch every day. I HATE deciding what to cook. I have more important things to do. I make a big batch of something on Sunday and eat it the rest of the week. 

Now you don’t have to worry about this daily details, so you can focus on better things. 
 


Step 5. Simplifying is social.

Trying to downsize on your own, without support or help, makes an already difficult thing so much more difficult. 

Shopping is a social activity. Consumption is social. So why can’t we downsize in a social setting? 

You need a community, a few friends, a support system. Without it, you’ll get so frustrated and bogged down.

Most people quit at some place during their journey because without a support system, you have no one to cheer you on when you’re in the thick of it. Your house looks worse than it did before and you need to ask a friend over to help you. To tell you what clothes to get rid of. 

I like the idea of starting a “consumers anonymous” monthly group that gets together and talks about simply living. Work through your struggles. Encourage each other!

You can also join Tiny Transition and Downsizing where we have an incredible supportive group of people to cheer you on, lift you up, and answer all of your questions. Not sure what to keep? Post a picture and the group will tell you. Struggling to get rid of something you know you don’t want? Come into the forum and get the perspective of all of your peers. It's my favorite part :)
 


Step 6. Face the fear head on.

In the past few years I’ve done a lot of experimentation with living with very few physical things. My journey into a small space looked a lot like this:

1. 1200 square feet of space stuffed to the brim with clutter.

2. 112 square feet - my vintage trailer home has perfect storage and plenty of space for two, but I got rid of 90% of my stuff to fit into it.

3. 35 square feet - my partner and I lived in our Honda Element (converted into a micro-camper) for 6 months in the past year while we traveled. All of our stuff fit under the sleeping platform, in bags, or over our heads strapped up to the ceiling.

4. One medium sized bag - Since October I’ve been living out of just one bag, a duffel bag, while we live in a client’s home that we are renovating and restoring this winter. 

So that’s 1200 square feet -> 112 square feet -> 35 square feet -> appx. 6 cubic feet of space for my stuff.

Needless to say, I’ve had quite a bit of experience with downsizing. My stuff no longer owns me, instead I have control over what physical items affect my day to day life. 
 

My stuff no longer owns me, instead I have control over what physical items affect my day to day life.

I think my progression perfectly exemplifies the idea that downsizing is a process, not an event, as one of my students in the Tiny Transition and Downsizing e-Course has said.

It has to happen in steps - not all at once. If you try to do too much at once, you’ll get frustrated, fed up, and overwhelmed. You’ll feel defeated.

Another thing I’ve learned after downsizing four major times in the past few years is that it never gets less scary, until you take the leap. I was freaking terrified of moving into the COMET Camper, my 112 square foot vintage trailer home.

I played it cool of course, but I secretly wondered if I could do it. How would it feel? Would my partner and I get really frustrated with each other? Will I miss my stuff?

But when I actually made the transition, all of my worries and anxieties fell away.

It only felt GOOD. I felt FREE and CONTENT for the first time, in this very basic and primal way.

I’ve been following that feeling for years now, making decisions based on what makes me feel free, uncluttered, and relaxed. Having less stuff, spending time being creative, and meeting new people are all things that bring me happiness now that “stuff” doesn’t factor into how I operate.

When we decided to move into the Honda Element for 6 months, I was again really nervous about the transition.

I was anxious because unlike the COMET Camper, which has a composting toilet, the Element had no toilet. I thought (again) that my partner Matt and I would go crazy.

I over-packed because I was so nervous - somehow I figured that bringing more sweaters would insulate me from anything bad or unexpected happening on our travels. 

For some reason I figured that bringing more sweaters would insulate me from anything bad or unexpected happening on our travels.


But it turns out, we LOVE living in that tiny little toaster of a car. It’s perfect for us. We love the ease of mobility, the good gas mileage, and the “just get up and ADVENTURE” that happens every day that we’re on the road. 

The point is, even though I know more about downsizing than most, even I was sacred, nervous, and unsure at first. I didn’t have a community of supporters when I started this journey. I had to convince my partner that it wasn’t crazy or totally out of our reach. I had no guidance, or re-assurance.

But in the end it was the BEST decision I have ever, ever made. 

People who have let go of their stuff (and more than just the physical stuff: the emotional stuff, the real reasons behind the “stuff”, and the desire to have more and more) understand what I’m talking about. Before you take the leap it seems unattainable to be tiny (or even just small, clear, and de-cluttered). But it’s not a far-off dream. If you like to feel free, un-cluttered, stress-free, and lighter - it just takes some hard work and a little nudge and accountability.
 


Step 7: Remember that this is a PROCESS, not an EVENT.

Eight weeks is just a start. You can make amazing progress in 8 weeks - but the main thing to remember is that simplifying becomes a new way of life. It’s a HABIT, it requires maintenance and mindfulness. 

Some people take Tiny Transition and Downsizing for a year, making progress at their own pace. Some people start the course and have gotten rid of 90% of their belongings and moved into their tiny house in 7 weeks! Everyone is different.

There is no “one” way to do this process. Everyone goes at their own pace, and everyone is in a different situation. It took me 2 years of downsizing actively (this was 6 years ago) to get to the point where I was happy with my stuff and my life. 

Don’t get frustrated with yourself or your progress. It takes a long time. You spent years and years accumulating stuff, it’s not going to disappear overnight. Even just starting this process is more than what 99% of people attempt to do. Most people just stay in the sleep - work - buy shit - die cycle. You’re awesome for thinking about making a big change. 


I created the Tiny Transition and Downsizing E-Course to give you the tools you need to let go of your stuff, let go of your emotional baggage and digital clutter, and create a new life with new habits and more happiness. 

When you sign up for the Tiny Transition and Downsizing E-Course, you get:

  • 8 weeks of downsizing lessons and challenges (it's like Downsizing bootcamp!)
  • LIFETIME access to the private class forum
  • Accountability, support, motivation and camaraderie from me and your classmates
  • The tools you need to simplify your home, mind, and LIFE starting right now.

We go through everything from the WHY you have so much stuff and why it’s hard to downsize, HOW to happily get rid of your physical clutter and emotional baggage, how to downsize your expenses and digital life and more. All within a supportive group of other people on the same journey towards simplicity. 

During the 8 weeks of the E-Course you will:

  • Clear your space and mind of clutter, making room for what's important to you
  • Change your entire mindset and outlook on "stuff", finally finding peace and focus
  • Meet a group of soon-to-be lifelong friends who share your outlook and values and are on your same path towards simple living
  • Get the motivation and support you need to make major life-changes for the better
  • Make real, tangible steps to getting into a tinier, happier life

If you want to join me and a class full of motivated downsizers like yourself for an intense journey to simplified homes, lives, closets, and minds, come hang out in the next session of the Tiny Transition and Downsizing E-Course. You’ll have (lifetime) access to a private class forum so you can meet and connect with like-minded people, make new friends, and find motivation and support.

The next session of Tiny Transition and Downsizing begins on May 3rd. Register now to save your spot in the class. I hope to see you there, and I look forward to supporting you on this journey! 

No Regrets: Guest post from Troy Koubsky of Less Stuff, More Joy

Today I'm HONORED to share a guest post with you from someone very special. Troy Koubsky is a student in the Tiny Transition and Downsizing course, he was in the very first session over a year ago. Troy immediately stood out in the group as an incredible source of inspiration, motivation, and support. If you were having a bad day or struggling with downsizing, Troy was there to cheer you on and cheer you up. He quickly became a pillar of the vibrant community we have inside the course (Registration is now open for the session beginning on May 3rd! Register here).

Now, a year later, I am just completely in awe of the progress and transition Troy has made as a result of doing the course, setting goals for himself, and participating in the community forum. He keeps track of each item he donates and downsizes, inspiring everyone with his photos of progress. Troy is an incredible example of how living simply really is a lifelong process, he continues to curate and refine his beautiful life.

For the past year and a half Troy has remained an integral part of this community we've built in the course, he is an exemplary person and incredibly appreciated. I hope you enjoy reading Troy's post below.

I'll let Troy take it from here.

No Regrets, by Troy Koubsky

Stuff was controlling me, rather than me being in control of it.

This is part of my story with stuff.

I don’t understand myself sometimes and why I need things. I have struggled with the urge to collect stuff from an early age. There is no root person, and activity I feel has caused it to escalate out of control.

Make no mistake, it did get out of control.

A flood of emotion surely comes when I sit here, contemplate the hows, and whys, specifically my journey with collecting.

Tiny Home Builders Hands-On Tiny House Workshop Recap + Review (tons of photos!)

Have you ever been to a tiny house live workshop? Are you planning to attend one?

Well today's post will give you some of the details about what those weekend tiny house workshops are like!

Specifically, Matt and I help Dan Louche of Tiny Home Builders teach his hands-on tiny house building workshop in Atlanta, GA. We've taught and spoken at more than 25 tiny house events and workshops all over the country, and we especially LOVE Dan's workshops.

The Tiny Home Builders' workshops are the right combination of hands-on building experience (yes, you get to use all the power tools!) and super educational trainings on everything from electrical, plumbing, how to choose a trailer, and off grid systems and sustainable design (my specialty!). It's part classroom, part workshop, and it's really effective to learn about something in depth via the presentations, then actually go over the the tiny house you're building and try it out yourself. (Plus there's a fully-built tiny house on site).

Some people attend the workshop to learn about the "systems" and more complex elements, others to get the confidence to use power tools (for many people it's their first time using power tools or swinging hammers!), and others come to network and meet like-minded friends.

How to deal with building codes and zoning laws as they apply to tiny homes and trailers

Minimum square footage.

Composting toilets and solar showers. 

RV and trailer by-laws.

NIMBY (not in my back yard!).

Living “off the grid”. 

These are just a handful of the things we need to talk about when we talk about “building codes” and “zoning laws” as they apply to living in a tiny home or trailer. 

I literally get emails and questions about this every day, but until now I have been very hesitant to write a full response on this blog.

Why?

Building codes and zoning laws are such a hard topic to talk about because they literally differ from town to town. There is no one rule I could say that would be true for all (or even a handful) of places.

I wish it were easier, but it all comes down to talking with your local building inspector and talking through the process with them. Ultimately, that person will decide. It's good to form a relationship with them and be upfront about your plans and ideas. If you go about it in an open and honest way, they are much more likely to say yes and approve your home. 

I get this question a lot, so I've done my best to put together some guidelines. That being said, it's the one thing that is nearly impossible to answer! (Figures!)...

Leavin' Home for the Open Road: Q + A with Stef and Jerimiah of American Frolic

I'm super excited to share Stef and Jerimiah's camper life story with you today. Stef and Jerimiah blog over at American Frolic.  Stef and I have been chatting over email for a while now and I wanted to ask her all about her decision to purchase and move into a vintage camper indefinitely.

Her story reminds me so much of Matt and I a few years ago. We didn't have a big plan or know exactly how we were going to make it work, but we did! If you take the leap, good things happen.

I asked Stef all about their decision to live mobile in the camper, what the biggest challenges have been as they transition into the camper life, and where they'll end up. I hope you enjoy this Q + A with these rad people!

 

COMET CAMPER: How did you guys decide that you wanted to live in a trailer? What other options did you consider? What motivated you - financial, wanderlust, ecological?

AMERICAN FROLIC: We had both decided we wanted to leave Chicago over a year ago.  We bounced around the idea of moving back to California or maybe to Colorado but knew we would have to put down a double deposit not matter where we went. 

Then we talked about maybe buying a camper to live out of and travel till we found a home wherever we went.  Then that turned into the idea of trying to see the country and find a place we would want to call home, broaden the search to everywhere we could hitch up and travel to...