advice

Part 1: Advice for Buying your first vintage camper

Part 1: Advice for Buying your first vintage camper

Buying your first vintage camper project (and most of them are projects!) can be really fun and exciting, but it can also be a little stressful. There are so many variables, and for a lot of people it is a big investment. The next two posts, Part 1 and Part 2 of "Advice for Buying Your First Vintage Camper", are meant to de-mystify the searching for and purchasing of that big vintage chunk of aluminum for first timers.

I want to give other people looking to purchase and restore, re-do, fix up, or completely green-ify and convert campers a resource or a "buying guide" for picking out your first camper project. Here is my advice for what to look for and what to watch out for when buying a vintage camper. In Part 1 of this post, I'm going to talk about the preliminary search for your camper. Part 2 will detail what to look for specifically when you are physically checking out the camper for the first time. Often times, first time buyers of vintage campers find something that looks really good on the surface, but has underlying problems that can get in the way of completing the project. Depending on your skills, different campers are going to be more or less difficult to fix. That is not to say that anything is impossible for anyone, of any skill level! I love using vintage campers because the systems are simple, and the small scale means even if you have to replace ALL the plumbing (or anything else) that's really no big deal. You know when you look at a schematic or a diagram, and it's just a couple of inches of line between the fuses and switches in the picture? Well, that's basically a scale diagram when you're talking about campers.